Как да пишем: Лъвкрафт, Кинг и други писатели

Кътче за развихряне на въображението. Рисунки, разкази, поезия... Фен арт по Стивън Кинг - с предимство ;)

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Как да пишем: Лъвкрафт, Кинг и други писатели

Post by deadface » Wed Sep 24, 2008 2:37 pm

Ето съветите на Лъвкрафт, който Стивън Кинг често нарича свой учител, как да пишем проза (и в частност страховити/свръхестествени истории):


My reason for writing stories is to give myself the satisfaction of visualising more clearly and detailedly and stably the vague, elusive, fragmentary impressions of wonder, beauty, and adventurous expectancy which are conveyed to me by certain sights (scenic, architectural, atmospheric, etc.), ideas, occurrences, and images encountered in art and literature. I choose weird stories because they suit my inclination best - one of my strongest and most persistent wishes being to achieve, momentarily, the illusion of some strange suspension or violation of the galling limitations of time, space, and natural law which forever imprison us and frustrate our curiosity about the infinite cosmic spaces beyond the radius of our sight and analysis. These stories frequently emphasise the element of horror because fear is our deepest and strongest emotion, and the one which best lends itself to the creation of Nature-defying illusions. Horror and the unknown or the strange are always closely connected, so that it is hard to create a convincing picture of shattered natural law or cosmic alienage or outsideness" without laying stress on the emotion of fear. The reason why time plays a great part in so many of my tales is that this element looms up in my mind as the most profoundly dramatic and grimly terrible thing in the universe. Conflict with time seems to me the most potent and fruitful theme in all human expression.

While my chosen form of story-writing is obviously a special and perhaps a narrow one, it is none the less a persistent and permanent type of expression, as old as literature itself. There will always be a certain small percentage of persons who feel a burning curiosity about unknown outer space, and a burning desire to escape from the prison-house of the known and the real into those enchanted lands of incredible adventure and infinite possibilities which dreams open up to us, and which things like deep woods, fantastic urban towers, and flaming sunsets momentarily suggest. These persons include great authors as well as insignificant amateurs like myself - Dunsany, Poe, Arthur Machen, M. R. James, Algernon Blackwood, and Walter de la Mare being typical masters in this field.

As to how I write a story - there is no one way. Each one of my tales has a different history. Once or twice I have literally written out a dream; but usually I start with a mood or idea or image which I wish to express, and revolve it in my mind until I can think of a good way of embodying it in some chain of dramatic occurrences capable of being recorded in concrete terms. I tend to run through a mental list of the basic conditions or situations best adapted to such a mood or idea or image, and then begin to speculate on logical and naturally motivated explanations of the given mood or idea or image in terms of the basic condition or situation chosen.

The actual process of writing is of course as varied as the choice of theme and initial conception; but if the history of all my tales were analysed, it is just possible that the following set of rules might be deduced from the average procedure:

1. Prepare a synopsis or scenario of events in the order of their absolute occurrence - not the order of their narration. Describe with enough fulness to cover all vital points and motivate all incidents planned. Details, comments, and estimates of consequences are sometimes desirable in this temporary framework.

2. Prepare a second synopsis or scenario of events - this one in order of narration (not actual occurrence), with ample fulness and detail, and with notes as to changing perspective, stresses, and climax. Change the original synopsis to fit if such a change will increase the dramatic force or general effectiveness of the story. Interpolate or delete incidents at will - never being bound by the original conception even if the ultimate result be a tale wholly different from that first planned. Let additions and alterations be made whenever suggested by anything in the for mulating process.

3. Write out the story - rapidly, fluently, and not too critically - following the second or narrativeorder synopsis. Change incidents and plot whenever the developing process seems to suggest such change, never being bound by any previous design. If the development suddenly reveals new opportunities for dramatic effect or vivid story telling, add whatever is thought advantageous - going back and reconciling the early parts to the new plan. Insert and delete whole sections if necessary or desirable, trying different beginnings and endings until the best arrangement is found. But be sure that all references throughout the story are thoroughly reconciled with the final design. Remove all possible superfluities - words, sentences, paragraphs, or whole episodes or elements - observing the usual precautions about the reconciling of all references.

4. Revise the entire text, paying attention to vocabulary, syntax, rhythm of prose, proportioning of parts, niceties of tone, grace and convincingness of transitions (scene to scene, slow and detailed action to rapid and sketchy time-covering action and vice versa... etc., etc., etc.), effectiveness of beginning, ending, climaxes, etc., dramatic suspense and interest, plausibility and atmosphere, and various other elements.

5. Prepare a neatly typed copy - not hesitating to add final revisory touches where they seem in order.

The first of these stages is often purely a mental one - a set of conditions and happenings being worked out in my head, and never set down until I am ready to prepare a detailed synopsis of events in order of narration. Then, too, I sometimes begin even the actual writing before I know how I shall develop the idea - this beginning forming a problem to be motivated and exploited.

There are, I think, four distinct types of weird story; one expressing a mood or feeling, another expressing a pictorial conception, a third expressing a general situation, condition, legend or intellectual conception, and a fourth explaining a definite tableau or specific dramatic situation or climax. In another way, weird tales may be grouped into two rough categories - those in which the marvel or horror concerns some condition or phenomenon, and those in which it concerns some action of persons in connexion with a bizarre condition or phenomenon.

Each weird story - to speak more particularly of the horror type - seems to involve five definite elements:
(a) some basic, underlying horror or abnormality - condition, entity, etc. - ,
(b) the general effects or bearings of the horror,
(c) the mode of manifestation - object embodying the horror and phenomena observed - ,
(d) the types of fear-reaction pertaining to the horror,
(e) the specific effects of the horror in relation to the given set of conditions.

In writing a weird story I always try very carefully to achieve the right mood and atmosphere, and place the emphasis where it belongs. One cannot, except in immature pulp charlatan-fiction, present an account of impossible, improbable, or inconceivable phenomena as a commonplace narrative of objective acts and conventional emotions. Inconceivable events and conditions have a special handicap to over come, and this can be accomplished only through the maintenance of a careful realism in every phase of the story except that touching on the one given marvel. This marvel must be treated very impressively and deliberately - with a careful emotional "build-up" - else it will seem flat and unconvincing. Being the principal thing in the story, its mere existence should overshadow the characters and events. But the characters and events must be consistent and natural except where they touch the single marvel. In relation to the central wonder, the characters should shew the same overwhelming emotion which similar characters would shew toward such a wonder in real life. Never have a wonder taken for granted. Even when the characters are supposed to be accustomed to the wonder I try to weave an air of awe and impressiveness corresponding to what the reader should feel. A casual style ruins any serious fantasy.

Atmosphere, not action, is the great desideratum of weird fiction. Indeed, all that a wonder story can ever be is a vivid picture of a certain type of human mood. The moment it tries to be anything else it becomes cheap, puerile, and unconvincing. Prime emphasis should be given to subtle suggestion - imperceptible hints and touches of selective associative detail which express shadings of moods and build up a vague illusion of the strange reality of the unreal. Avoid bald catalogues of incredible happenings which can have no substance or meaning apart from a sustaining cloud of colour and symbolism.

These are the rules or standards which I have followed - consciously or unconsciously - ever since I first attempted the serious writing of fantasy. That my results are successful may well be disputed - but I feel at least sure that, had I ignored the considerations mentioned in the last few paragraphs, they would have been much worse than they are.

© H. P. Lovecraft

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Как да пишем: Кърт Вонегът

Post by deadface » Wed Sep 24, 2008 2:47 pm

И на Кърт Вонегът:

Eight rules for writing fiction:

1. Use the time of a total stranger in such a way that he or she will not feel the time was wasted.

2. Give the reader at least one character he or she can root for.

3. Every character should want something, even if it is only a glass of water.

4. Every sentence must do one of two things -- reveal character or advance the action.

5. Start as close to the end as possible.

6. Be a sadist. No matter how sweet and innocent your leading characters, make awful things happen to them -- in order that the reader may see what they are made of.

7. Write to please just one person. If you open a window and make love to the world, so to speak, your story will get pneumonia.

8. Give your readers as much information as possible as soon as possible. To heck with suspense. Readers should have such complete understanding of what is going on, where and why, that they could finish the story themselves, should cockroaches eat the last few pages.

© Kurt Vonnegut

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Re: Как да пишем: Лъвкрафт и други писатели

Post by Vokial » Fri Nov 07, 2008 8:34 am

Как да пишем по-добре
от Стивън Кинг


1. Пишете по същество
Не губете времето на читателя с прекалено дълги встъпления, лирически отклонения и дълги разкази за вашия живот. Преминете към същността бързо, за да не загубят читателите интерес.

2. Направете си чернова
След това - всичко останало. Сложете черновата настрани за известно време. Това ще ви позволи да промените потока на мислите си и да получите ясна перспектива за текста. Сами определете колко да е това време. Понякога ден-два са достатъчни.

3. Съкращавайте текста
Премахнете всички излишни думи и изречения. Това ще внесе яснота и емоционалност в текста ви. Не бива да се увличате. Съкращаването може да е към 10%, не повече.

4. Бъдете честни
Това ще създаде мощна емоционална връзка между вас и читателя. Използвайте прост и разбираем език; думи, които първо ви идват наум.

5. Не мислете за критиците
Не се тревожете за това какво ще си помислят другите за вас. Ако обръщате прекалено много внимание на критиката, ще напишете твърде малко.

6. Четете много
Това ще ви помогне да почерпите нови идеи, да разберете как не бива да се пише, да разширите хоризонтите си, да задълбочите познанията си.

7. Пишете много
Колкото и да е странно, за да пишете по-добре е нужно да пишете повече. Много хора чакат вдъхновение, но всъщност трябва просто да си седнат на стола и да пишат. Съмнението се превръща в ентусиазъм...

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Re: Как да пишем: Лъвкрафт и други писатели

Post by deadface » Fri Nov 07, 2008 10:28 am

Още няколко съвета на Кинг как да пишем


1. The basics: forget plot, but remember the importance of 'situation'

I won't try to convince you that I've never plotted any more than I'd try to convince you that I've never told a lie, but I do both as infrequently as possible. I distrust plot for two reasons: first, because our lives are largely plotless, even when you add in all our reasonable precautions and careful planning; and second, because I believe plotting and the spontaneity of real creation aren't compatible.

A strong enough situation renders the whole question of plot moot. The most interesting situations can usually be expressed as a What-if question:

What if vampires invaded a small New England village? (Salem's Lot).

What if a young mother and her son became trapped in their stalled car by a rabid dog? (Cujo).

These were situations which occurred to me - while showering, while driving, while taking my daily walk - and which I eventually turned into books. In no case were they plotted, not even to the extent of a single note jotted on a single piece of scrap paper.

2. Similes and metaphors - the rights, the wrongs

When a simile or metaphor doesn't work, the results are sometimes funny and sometimes embarrassing. Recently, I read this sentence in a forthcoming novel I prefer not to name: 'He sat stolidly beside the corpse, waiting for the medical examiner as patiently as a man waiting for a turkey sandwich.' If there is a clarifying connection here, I wasn't able to make it.

My all-time favourite similes come from the hard-boiled-detective fiction of the 40s and 50s, and the literary descendants of the dime-dreadful writers. These favourites include 'It was darker than a carload of assholes' (George V Higgins) and 'I lit a cigarette [that] tasted like a plumber's handkerchief' (Raymond Chandler).

3. Dialogue: talk is 'sneaky'

It's dialogue that gives your cast their voices, and is crucial in defining their characters - only what people do tells us more about what they're like, and talk is sneaky: what people say often conveys their character to others in ways of which they - the speakers - are completely unaware.

Well-crafted dialogue will indicate if a character is smart or dumb, honest or dishonest, amusing or an old sobersides. Good dialogue, such as that written by George V Higgins, Peter Straub or Graham Greene, is a delight to read; bad dialogue is deadly.

4. Characters: nobody is the 'bad-guy'

The job boils down to two things: paying attention to how the real people around you behave and then telling the truth about what you see. It's also important to remember that no one is 'the bad guy' or 'the best friend' or 'the whore with a heart of gold' in real life; in real life we each of us regard ourselves as the main character, the protagonist, the big cheese; the camera is on us , baby. If you can bring this attitude into your fiction, you may not find it easier to create brilliant characters, but it will be harder for you to create the sort of one-dimensional dopes that populate so much pop fiction.

5. Pace: fast is not always best

Pace is the speed at which your narrative unfolds. There is a kind of unspoken (hence undefended and unexamined) belief in publishing circles that the most commercially successful stories and novels are fast-paced. Like so many unexamined beliefs in the publishing business, this idea is largely bullshit... which is why, when books like Umberto Eco's The Name of the Rose suddenly break out of the pack and climb the bestseller lists, publishers and editors are astonished. I suspect that most of them ascribe these books' unexpected success to unpredictable and deplorable lapses into good taste on the part of the reading public.

I believe each story should be allowed to unfold at its own pace, and that pace is not always double time. Nevertheless, you need to beware - if you slow the pace down too much, even the most patient reader is apt to grow restive.

6. Do the research, but don't overdo it for the reader

You may be entranced with what you're learning about flesh-eating bacteria, the sewer system of New York, or the IQ potential of Collie pups, but your readers are probably going to care a lot more about your characters and your story.

Exceptions to the rule? Sure, aren't there always? There have been very successful writers - Arthur Hailey and James Michener are the first ones that come to my mind - whose novels rely heavily on fact and research. Other popular writers, such as Tom Clancy and Patricia Cornwell, are more story-oriented, but still deliver large dollops of factual information along with the melodrama. I sometimes think that these writers appeal to a large segment of the reading population who feel that fiction is somehow immoral, a low taste which can only be justified by saying, 'Well, ahem, yes, I do read [fill in author's name here], but only on airplanes and in hotel rooms that don't have CNN; also, I learned a great deal about [fill in appropriate subject here].'

7. Never look at a reference book while doing a first draft

You want to write a story? Fine. Put away your dictionary, your encyclopedias, your World Almanac, and your thesaurus. Better yet, throw your thesaurus into the wastebasket. The only things creepier than a thesaurus are those little paperbacks college students too lazy to read the assigned novels buy around exam time. Any word you have to hunt for in a thesaurus is the wrong word. There are no exceptions to this rule. You think you might have misspelled a word? O.K., so here is your choice: either look it up in the dictionary, thereby making sure you have it right - and breaking your train of thought and the writer's trance in the bargain - or just spell it phonetically and correct it later. Why not? Did you think it was going to go somewhere? And if you need to know the largest city in Brazil and you find you don't have it in your head, why not write in Miami, or Cleveland? You can check it ... but later. When you sit down to write, write. Don't do anything else except go to the bathroom, and only do that if it absolutely cannot be put off.

8. Be self-critical

If you haven't marked up your manuscript a lot, you did a lazy job. Only God gets things right the first time. Don't be a slob.

9. Remove every extraneous word

You want to get up on a soapbox and preach? Fine. Get one and try your local park. You want to write for money? Get to the point. And if you remove all the excess garbage and discover you can't find the point, tear up what you wrote and start all over again . . . or try something new.

10. Write to entertain

Does this mean you can't write "serious fiction"? It does not. Somewhere along the line pernicious critics have invested the American reading and writing public with the idea that entertaining fiction and serious ideas do not overlap. This would have surprised Charles Dickens, not to mention Jane Austen, John Steinbeck, William Faulkner, Bernard Malamud, and hundreds of others. But your serious ideas must always serve your story, not the other way around. I repeat: if you want to preach, get a soapbox.

11. Ask yourself frequently, "Am I having fun?"

The answer needn't always be yes. But if it's always no, it's time for a new project or a new career.

12. How to evaluate criticism

Show your piece to a number of people - ten, let us say. Listen carefully to what they tell you. Smile and nod a lot. Then review what was said very carefully. If your critics are all telling you the same thing about some facet of your story - a plot twist that doesn't work, a character who rings false, stilted narrative, or half a dozen other possibles - change that facet. It doesn't matter if you really liked that twist of that character; if a lot of people are telling you something is wrong with you piece, it is. If seven or eight of them are hitting on that same thing, I'd still suggest changing it. But if everyone - or even most everyone - is criticizing something different, you can safely disregard what all of them say.

13. If it's bad, kill it

When it comes to people, mercy killing is against the law. When it comes to fiction, it is the law.

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Re: Как да пишем: Лъвкрафт, Кинг и други писатели

Post by Vokial » Fri Sep 18, 2009 11:04 pm

Наръчник за гладко писане - Умберто Еко

1. Не допускай изречения от по една дума. Дразнят.

2. Избягвай фразеологизмите - откак свят светува, те са бита карта.

3. Внимавай да не задръстиш текста с... многоточия.

4. Не ползвай търговски сигли & съкращения и т.н.

5. Помни (винаги), че скобите (дори когато ти се струват необходими) прекъсват нишката на повествованието.

6. Написаното е зграда чийто основи са правописът.

7. Възможно най-рядко поставяй кавички: нищо не "губиш".

8. Никога не обобщавай.

9. Чуждиците съвсем не са индикация за bon ton.

10. Бъди крайно пестелив откъм цитати. Както казва Емерсон: "Мразя цитатите. Изразявам се със собствени мисли."

11. Сравненията наподобяват фразеологизмите.

12. Не претрупвай фразата; не повтаряй два пъти едно и също; да повтаряш два пъти едно и също е излишно (под "претрупване" следва да се разбира ненужното разгръщане или обяснение на идея, която читателят очевидно вече е разбрал от самото начало, без повтаряне).

13. Само тъпите копелета се изразяват просташки.

14. Може би не е лошо да бъдеш повече или по-малко конкретен.

15. Литотата е най-великата от изразните техники.

16. Не смесвай висок и нисък стил - както и да ги изтипосаш, няма да стане по-яко.

17. Ако пишеш скучно, турцизмите също няма да ти оправят дереджето.

18. Слагай, запетайките, където им е мястото.

19. Не минавай често на нов ред.

Стига, разбира се, това да не е наложително.

20. Прекалено дръзката метафора е безпомощна като дерайлирал лебед.

21. Между впрочем, употребявай думите правилно, всяка щекотливост може да те провали.

22. Толкова ли не може без реторични въпроси?

23. Бъди кратък и ясен, старай се да съсредоточиш идеите си във възможно най-малкия брой думи, като грижливо избягваш дългите фрази - още повече накъсаните с вметнати изречения между тирета, които неизбежно разконцентрират невнимателния читател, - така че да не допринесеш с твоя начин на изказване за онова в крайна степен наситено и зловредно информационно замърсяване, което без съмнение (и най-вече в случаите, когато става въпрос за текстове, натъпкани с ненужни или лесно избежими уточнения) е една от трагедиите на нашето съвремие, робски подчинено на диктата на медиите, били те електронни или не.

24. Правилната употреба на пълният член може и да ти изглежда най-несъществения проблем, но за много читатели е важен белег за твоят културен статус.

25. Не бъди излишно емоционален! Не злоупотребявай с възклицателните!

26. Ползвайки голям брой деепричастия се излагаш, показвайки, че или превеждаш лошо, или се правиш на забележителен, прибягвайки до не особено типични за твоя език средства.

27. Наричай направо с имената им авторите и персонажите, които имаш предвид, без перифрази. Не забравяй, че още в края на XIX в. така правеше Патриарха на българската литература, когато пишеше златните си страници за Апостола на свободата и останалите.

28. В началото прибегни до captatio benevolentiae, за да спечелиш читателя (ако разбираш какво имам предвид).

29. Всяка завършена фраза трябва да има.

30. И не започвай изреченията със съюз.

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Re: Как да пишем: Лъвкрафт, Кинг и други писатели

Post by deadface » Fri Sep 18, 2009 11:39 pm

Има добри съвети, но не мисля, че идват от Умберто Еко :huh:

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Re: Как да пишем: Лъвкрафт, Кинг и други писатели

Post by Vokial » Sat Sep 19, 2009 1:04 am

Някъде са дадени примери, които ще са по-разбирами за България, като това с Вазов.

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Re: Как да пишем: Лъвкрафт, Кинг и други писатели

Post by deadface » Sat Mar 12, 2011 11:58 pm

Everything You Need to Know About Writing Successfully: in Ten Minutes
by Stephen King


I. The First Introduction
THAT'S RIGHT. I know it sounds like an ad for some sleazy writers' school, but I really am going to tell you everything you need to pursue a successful and financially rewarding career writing fiction, and I really am going to do it in ten minutes, which is exactly how long it took me to learn. It will actually take you twenty minutes or so to read this essay, however, because I have to tell you a story, and then I have to write a second introduction. But these, I argue, should not count in the ten minutes.

II. The Story, or, How Stephen King Learned to Write
When I was a sophomore in high school, I did a sophomoric thing which got me in a pot of fairly hot water, as sophomoric didoes often do. I wrote and published a small satiric newspaper called The Village Vomit. In this little paper I lampooned a number of teachers at Lisbon (Maine) High School, where I was under instruction. These were not very gentle lampoons; they ranged from the scatological to the downright cruel.
Eventually, a copy of this little newspaper found its way into the hands of a faculty member, and since I had been unwise enough to put my name on it (a fault, some critics argue, of which I have still not been entirely cured), I was brought into the office. The sophisticated satirist had by that time reverted to what he really was: a fourteen-year-old kid who was shaking in his boots and wondering if he was going to get a suspension ... what we called "a three-day vacation" in those dim days of 1964.
I wasn't suspended. I was forced to make a number of apologies - they were warranted, but they still tasted like dog-dirt in my mouth - and spent a week in detention hall. And the guidance counselor arranged what he no doubt thought of as a more constructive channel for my talents. This was a job - contingent upon the editor's approval - writing sports for the Lisbon Enterprise, a twelve-page weekly of the sort with which any small-town resident will be familiar. This editor was the man who taught me everything I know about writing in ten minutes. His name was John Gould - not the famed New England humorist or the novelist who wrote The Greenleaf Fires, but a relative of both, I believe.
He told me he needed a sports writer and we could "try each other out" if I wanted.
I told him I knew more about advanced algebra than I did sports.
Gould nodded and said, "You'll learn."
I said I would at least try to learn. Gould gave me a huge roll of yellow paper and promised me a wage of 1/2¢ per word. The first two pieces I wrote had to do with a high school basketball game in which a member of my school team broke the Lisbon High scoring record. One of these pieces was straight reportage. The second was a feature article.
I brought them to Gould the day after the game, so he'd have them for the paper, which came out Fridays. He read the straight piece, made two minor corrections, and spiked it. Then he started in on the feature piece with a large black pen and taught me all I ever needed to know about my craft. I wish I still had the piece - it deserves to be framed, editorial corrections and all - but I can remember pretty well how it looked when he had finished with it. Here's an example:
(note: this is before the edit marks indicated on King's original copy)
Last night, in the well-loved gymnasium of Lisbon High School, partisans and Jay Hills fans alike were stunned by an athletic performance unequaled in school history: Bob Ransom, known as "Bullet" Bob for both his size and accuracy, scored thirty-seven points. He did it with grace and speed ... and he did it with an odd courtesy as well, committing only two personal fouls in his knight-like quest for a record which has eluded Lisbon thinclads since 1953....
(after edit marks)
Last night, in the Lisbon High School gymnasium, partisans and Jay Hills fans alike were stunned by an athletic performance unequaled in school history: Bob Ransom scored thirty-seven points. He did it with grace and speed ... and he did it with an odd courtesy as well, committing only two personal fouls in his quest for a record which has eluded Lisbon's basketball team since 1953....
When Gould finished marking up my copy in the manner I have indicated above, he looked up and must have seen something on my face. I think he must have thought it was horror, but it was not: it was revelation.
"I only took out the bad parts, you know," he said. "Most of it's pretty good."
"I know," I said, meaning both things: yes, most of it was good, and yes, he had only taken out the bad parts. "I won't do it again."
"If that's true," he said, "you'll never have to work again. You can do this for a living." Then he threw back his head and laughed.
And he was right; I am doing this for a living, and as long as I can keep on, I don't expect ever to have to work again.

III. The Second Introduction
All of what follows has been said before. If you are interested enough in writing to be a purchaser of this magazine, you will have either heard or read all (or almost all) of it before. Thousands of writing courses are taught across the United States each year; seminars are convened; guest lecturers talk, then answer questions, then drink as many gin and tonics as their expense-fees will allow, and it all boils down to what follows.
I am going to tell you these things again because often people will only listen - really listen - to someone who makes a lot of money doing the thing he's talking about. This is sad but true. And I told you the story above not to make myself sound like a character out of a Horatio Alger novel but to make a point: I saw, I listened, and I learned. Until that day in John Gould's little office, I had been writing first drafts of stories which might run 2,500 words. The second drafts were apt to run 3,300 words. Following that day, my 2,500-word first drafts became 2,200-word second drafts. And two years after that, I sold the first one.
So here it is, with all the bark stripped off. It'll take ten minutes to read, and you can apply it right away ... if you listen.

IV. Everything You Need to Know About Writing Successfully

1. Be talented

This, of course, is the killer. What is talent? I can hear someone shouting, and here we are, ready to get into a discussion right up there with "what is the meaning of life?" for weighty pronouncements and total uselessness. For the purposes of the beginning writer, talent may as well be defined as eventual success - publication and money. If you wrote something for which someone sent you a check, if you cashed the check and it didn't bounce, and if you then paid the light bill with the money, I consider you talented.
Now some of you are really hollering. Some of you are calling me one crass money-fixated creep. And some of you are calling me bad names. Are you calling Harold Robbins talented? someone in one of the Great English Departments of America is screeching. V.C. Andrews? Theodore Dreiser? Or what about you, you dyslexic moron?
Nonsense. Worse than nonsense, off the subject. We're not talking about good or bad here. I'm interested in telling you how to get your stuff published, not in critical judgments of who's good or bad. As a rule the critical judgments come after the check's been spent, anyway. I have my own opinions, but most times I keep them to myself. People who are published steadily and are paid for what they are writing may be either saints or trollops, but they are clearly reaching a great many someones who want what they have. Ergo, they are communicating. Ergo, they are talented. The biggest part of writing successfully is being talented, and in the context of marketing, the only bad writer is one who doesn't get paid. If you're not talented, you won't succeed. And if you're not succeeding, you should know when to quit.
When is that? I don't know. It's different for each writer. Not after six rejection slips, certainly, nor after sixty. But after six hundred? Maybe. After six thousand? My friend, after six thousand pinks, it's time you tried painting or computer programming.
Further, almost every aspiring writer knows when he is getting warmer - you start getting little jotted notes on your rejection slips, or personal letters . . . maybe a commiserating phone call. It's lonely out there in the cold, but there are encouraging voices ... unless there is nothing in your words which warrants encouragement. I think you owe it to yourself to skip as much of the self-illusion as possible. If your eyes are open, you'll know which way to go ... or when to turn back.

2. Be neat

Type. Double-space. Use a nice heavy white paper, never that erasable onion-skin stuff. If you've marked up your manuscript a lot, do another draft.

3. Be self-critical

If you haven't marked up your manuscript a lot, you did a lazy job. Only God gets things right the first time. Don't be a slob.

4. Remove every extraneous word

You want to get up on a soapbox and preach? Fine. Get one and try your local park. You want to write for money? Get to the point. And if you remove all the excess garbage and discover you can't find the point, tear up what you wrote and start all over again . . . or try something new.

5. Never look at a reference book while doing a first draft

You want to write a story? Fine. Put away your dictionary, your encyclopedias, your World Almanac, and your thesaurus. Better yet, throw your thesaurus into the wastebasket. The only things creepier than a thesaurus are those little paperbacks college students too lazy to read the assigned novels buy around exam time. Any word you have to hunt for in a thesaurus is the wrong word. There are no exceptions to this rule. You think you might have misspelled a word? O.K., so here is your choice: either look it up in the dictionary, thereby making sure you have it right - and breaking your train of thought and the writer's trance in the bargain - or just spell it phonetically and correct it later. Why not? Did you think it was going to go somewhere? And if you need to know the largest city in Brazil and you find you don't have it in your head, why not write in Miami, or Cleveland? You can check it ... but later. When you sit down to write, write. Don't do anything else except go to the bathroom, and only do that if it absolutely cannot be put off.

6. Know the markets

Only a dimwit would send a story about giant vampire bats surrounding a high school to McCall's. Only a dimwit would send a tender story about a mother and daughter making up their differences on Christmas Eve to Playboy ... but people do it all the time. I'm not exaggerating; I have seen such stories in the slush piles of the actual magazines. If you write a good story, why send it out in an ignorant fashion? Would you send your kid out in a snowstorm dressed in Bermuda shorts and a tank top? If you like science fiction, read the magazines. If you want to write confession stories, read the magazines. And so on. It isn't just a matter of knowing what's right for the present story; you can begin to catch on, after awhile, to overall rhythms, editorial likes and dislikes, a magazine's entire slant. Sometimes your reading can influence the next story, and create a sale.

7. Write to entertain

Does this mean you can't write "serious fiction"? It does not. Somewhere along the line pernicious critics have invested the American reading and writing public with the idea that entertaining fiction and serious ideas do not overlap. This would have surprised Charles Dickens, not to mention Jane Austen, John Steinbeck, William Faulkner, Bernard Malamud, and hundreds of others. But your serious ideas must always serve your story, not the other way around. I repeat: if you want to preach, get a soapbox.

8. Ask yourself frequently, "Am I having fun?"

The answer needn't always be yes. But if it's always no, it's time for a new project or a new career.

9. How to evaluate criticism

Show your piece to a number of people - ten, let us say. Listen carefully to what they tell you. Smile and nod a lot. Then review what was said very carefully. If your critics are all telling you the same thing about some facet of your story - a plot twist that doesn't work, a character who rings false, stilted narrative, or half a dozen other possibles - change that facet. It doesn't matter if you really liked that twist of that character; if a lot of people are telling you something is wrong with you piece, it is. If seven or eight of them are hitting on that same thing, I'd still suggest changing it. But if everyone - or even most everyone - is criticizing something different, you can safely disregard what all of them say.

10. Observe all rules for proper submission

Return postage, self-addressed envelope, all of that.

11. An agent? Forget it. For now

Agents get 10% of monies earned by their clients. 10% of nothing is nothing. Agents also have to pay the rent. Beginning writers do not contribute to that or any other necessity of life. Flog your stories around yourself. If you've done a novel, send around query letters to publishers, one by one, and follow up with sample chapters and/or the manuscript complete. And remember Stephen King's First Rule of Writers and Agents, learned by bitter personal experience: You don't need one until you're making enough for someone to steal ... and if you're making that much, you'll be able to take your pick of good agents.

12. If it's bad, kill it

When it comes to people, mercy killing is against the law. When it comes to fiction, it is the law.

That's everything you need to know. And if you listened, you can write everything and anything you want. Now I believe I will wish you a pleasant day and sign off.
My ten minutes are up.

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Re: Как да пишем: Лъвкрафт, Кинг и други писатели

Post by deadface » Wed Aug 24, 2011 3:44 am


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Re: Как да пишем: Лъвкрафт, Кинг и други писатели

Post by Vokial » Sat Mar 17, 2012 9:16 pm

Попаднах случайно в сайта в Нийл Геймън и там има някои интересни есета сред които:

Нийл Геймън: Where do you get your ideas?

Явно мислим еднакво с него по тия въпроси. Не съм разглеждал, но може и да има други подобни неща.

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Re: Как да пишем: Лъвкрафт, Кинг и други писатели

Post by Flesh » Sat Aug 31, 2013 1:28 am


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Re: Как да пишем: Лъвкрафт, Кинг и други писатели

Post by deadface » Fri Oct 18, 2013 6:32 am

Джон Стайнбек:

1. Abandon the idea that you are ever going to finish. Lose track of the 400 pages and write just one page for each day, it helps. Then when it gets finished, you are always surprised.

2. Write freely and as rapidly as possible and throw the whole thing on paper. Never correct or rewrite until the whole thing is down. Rewrite in process is usually found to be an excuse for not going on. It also interferes with flow and rhythm which can only come from a kind of unconscious association with the material.

3. Forget your generalized audience. In the first place, the nameless, faceless audience will scare you to death and in the second place, unlike the theater, it doesn’t exist. In writing, your audience is one single reader. I have found that sometimes it helps to pick out one person—a real person you know, or an imagined person and write to that one.

4. If a scene or a section gets the better of you and you still think you want it—bypass it and go on. When you have finished the whole you can come back to it and then you may find that the reason it gave trouble is because it didn’t belong there.

5. Beware of a scene that becomes too dear to you, dearer than the rest. It will usually be found that it is out of drawing.

6. If you are using dialogue—say it aloud as you write it. Only then will it have the sound of speech.


*

http://www.brainpickings.org/index.php/ ... n-writing/
Още съвети на Лъвкрафт

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Re: Как да пишем: Лъвкрафт, Кинг и други писатели

Post by deadface » Wed Jul 16, 2014 4:05 pm


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Re: Как да пишем: Лъвкрафт, Кинг и други писатели

Post by deadface » Tue Jan 13, 2015 2:38 am

http://www.openculture.com/2015/01/seve ... poems.html
Seven Tips from Edgar Allan Poe on How to Write Vivid Stories and Poems

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Re: Как да пишем: Лъвкрафт, Кинг и други писатели

Post by deadface » Sun Aug 16, 2015 4:25 am

http://uk.businessinsider.com/stephen-k ... z3ihXg64ZQ
22 lessons from Stephen King on how to be a great writer

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Re: Как да пишем: Лъвкрафт, Кинг и други писатели

Post by Selfsame » Wed Oct 14, 2015 12:47 am

Незнам дали тук е подходящо да задам въпроса си но все пак ще попитам някой има ли идея дали се провеждат online курсове по творческо писане на български език или изобщо къде мога да намеря някакви напътствия и теми за това?

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Re: Как да пишем: Лъвкрафт, Кинг и други писатели

Post by Flesh » Thu Oct 15, 2015 1:23 am

на български не се сещам за такова място
на английски https://litreactor.com/ е супер

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Re: Как да пишем: Лъвкрафт, Кинг и други писатели

Post by Vokial » Tue Feb 16, 2016 11:44 pm

Съвети за писане от Матю Грегъри Луис - аторът на "Монахът". Някои са събрани от негови писма и изказвания, други са изедени от уникалните му умения като писател, без да ги е изказвал пряко като препоръки.

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Re: Как да пишем: Лъвкрафт, Кинг и други писатели

Post by Flesh » Thu Nov 17, 2016 12:04 am

как да пишем като тоя лалугер паланюк
http://oshteedinblogzaknigi.com/2016/11 ... ato-chuck/

мисля си да я допълня в близко бъдеще
или пък да разширя някои от темите в отделни статии
пък по нататък, кой знае, може да пробвам със стивън кинг нещо подобно

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Re: Как да пишем: Лъвкрафт, Кинг и други писатели

Post by Darth Vader » Tue Nov 22, 2016 2:10 pm

:) Flesh, интересно четиво. Благодаря.
Според мен едно от най-важните неща е мотивът. Защо пишем? Коя е движещата ни сила? Какво искаме да кажем, и искаме ли изобщо нещо да кажем? Искрени ли сме?
Обожавам "Особени сезони" на Кинг. Там намерих всичко.

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